Posts tagged Cover and Thank You Letters
Structure Your Resume and Executive Job Search Strategy to Combat Ageism

Ageism in hiring and in the workplace after you have been hired is nothing new… Here are some anti-ageism steps to take in your executive job search and career management.

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Add Sizzle to a Boring Cover Letter

Cover letters can either excite a potential employer or bore him or her to tears. A major reason that your cover letter may be boring is that your language makes you come across as pompous or nineteenth century. Avoid overly formal or stilted language! Other things to watch out for…

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Don’t Shoot Yourself in the Foot: 8 Ways Your Cover Letter Could be Sabotaging You

It has unfortunately been my experience with a few executive clients that they take the high-impact executive resume we developed and send it out “bare” to a potential employer — without a customized cover letter. This comprises the first, and often fatal cover letter self-sabotage.

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After the Executive Job Interview: Be Sure to Send a Thank-You Letter!

One of the first things your parents taught you as a toddler was to say “please” and “thank you. The percentage of candidates who take the time to send thank-you emails or postal letters is abysmally low (some have cited under 4%), so this strategy is virtually guaranteed to make a major impression.

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A New Resource for Company Research

According to Weddles, there is a new and free online resource that can be of help in researching companies during your job search. Of course, traditional resources such as Vault, Brint, and Hoover’s offer a great deal of valuable information, some of it free, but much of it fee-based. The new resource is ZoomInfo.

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Does Your Cover Letter Come Across as Pompous?

The fact that many job seekers compose cover letters (and resumes, for that matter) that come across as pretentious and verbose is something that I witness every single day. Certainly a cover letter for an executive will have a more sophisticated tone than one for an entry level worker, but neither should be flowery or seem to be obviously trying to impress the reader with multi-syllable words where simple ones will do just fine.

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