Posts in Job Change Etiquette
How to Avoid an Executive Job Interview Disaster

For a successful executive-level job interview, here’s how to research the company thoroughly beforehand. It is so easy nowadays to find a wealth of information about a company you are considering or one that you are scheduled to interview with that there is just no good excuse not to do so!

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Don’t Shoot Yourself in the Foot: 8 Ways Your Cover Letter Could be Sabotaging You

It has unfortunately been my experience with a few executive clients that they take the high-impact executive resume we developed and send it out “bare” to a potential employer — without a customized cover letter. This comprises the first, and often fatal cover letter self-sabotage.

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What Can I Say if My Boss Notices I’ve Updated My LinkedIn Profile?

Oops! You recently made some changes or updates to your LinkedIn profile content and your boss or colleagues have noticed that and are asking you about it, or worse yet, have expressed disapproval or alarm. As an executive resume writer who is often asked by my executive clients for executive resume writing tips, I have found that…

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Be Mindful: Recruiters ARE LOOKING at Your Social Media Activity

Did you know that a full 87 PERCENT of recruiters use LinkedIn to reach out to potential candidates? And that the vast majority of employers weigh your positive or negative presence in social media heavily in making hiring decisions?

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Executive Job Search Tip: Want Good Answers? Ask the Right Questions.

Make your questions easy and quick to answer when you are approaching recruiters, current employees of companies, your connections on LinkedIn, and other members of your network! You’re much more likely to get a specific, helpful answer than “Gee, sorry, I don’t know of anything.”

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Avoid Making Any of These Executive Job Interview Mistakes

I particularly warn my executive resume clients against knowing little to nothing about the company you are interviewing with. Interview prep requires extensive research into the company, its market(s), the challenges it faces, and the opportunities it has (currently or in the near future).

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Dress for Success in Your Executive Job Interviews

You’ve got an absolutely stunning executive resume and LinkedIn profile, have practiced your responses to the toughest interview questions, and have researched everything you can find about your target companies. But don’t forget how you look at that upcoming interview.

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Have You Been Asked Any of These Awful Job Interview Questions?

A post I wrote recently on LinkedIn about How to Respond to Illegal Interview Questions generated quite a bit of interest. I was a bit surprised and in some cases alarmed or amused at the kinds of questions that misguided employers seem to think it is acceptable to ask job candidates.

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Why Can’t I List References on My Executive Resume?

Take a look at any site displaying sample executive resumes, and you will see that listing your references on the resume is not accepted practice. Doing so can actually make you appear out-of-date and possibly appear older than you are, risking ageism.

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After the Executive Job Interview: Be Sure to Send a Thank-You Letter!

One of the first things your parents taught you as a toddler was to say “please” and “thank you. The percentage of candidates who take the time to send thank-you emails or postal letters is abysmally low (some have cited under 4%), so this strategy is virtually guaranteed to make a major impression.

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Giving Notice When You’ve Accepted a New Executive Position

You have the job offer of your dreams and have accepted. Now you are wondering how and when (or if) to give notice to your current employer. Common business and career etiquette would seem to call for at least two weeks’ advance notice…

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How to Keep an Executive Job Search Secret from Your Employer

You’ve decided that it’s time to move on to greener pastures where your talents will be… The question now is: How to get the word out without alerting your boss or co-workers, with possible adverse consequences including reputation damage, perception as disloyal by your company, or even termination?

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